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Dedicated Aquarium Stands: Goood

Cat aquarium balancing act

If you read my previous build article on my 29 gallon creek tank, you may have noticed I took a shortcut in the aquarium furniture department. I warned against doing so, but I kind of learned the hard way to take my own advice.

No, the fish tank didn’t come crashing down in a tidal wave of broken glass, water and flopping fish.  I stand by my assertion that that you could park a car on that thing. No, instead something more unexpected happened.

Cat aquarium balancing act

Yes, that’s my acrobatic manx cat balancing along the edge of the aquarium.  Since the desk is bigger than the tank, he was able to hop right up and get an up-close view. A later census of the tank inhabitants confirmed that he had a small snack while he was there as well.

Fortunately, the stars aligned and that same day one of Petco’s 20% off deals landed in my inbox.  I got a pretty sweet deal on a simple, but not bad looking metal aquarium stand making it less than $40 shipped.

Putting the stand together was simple.  Moving the fish tank to it, not so much.

Here’s another word of sage advice that I actually followed:  Always completely empty an aquarium before trying to move it.

So I pulled out all the plants, transferred the fish to a bucket of aquarium water and got the sand out.  Don’t forget the substrate, that stuff can be heavy.

That was a pain in the butt, but the biggest problem was the creek chubs kept jumping out of the damn bucket.  One of them very nearly met its fishy demise.  I found it when I moved the desk out of the way to place the stand.  It was barely breathing by the time I got to it.

Fortunately, the fish seems no worse for wear after jumping over the Great Wall and is back to mercilessly harassing its tank mates.  That wasn’t even the only jumping incident.  Another of them made the leap while I watched.  At least after that I got smart enough to cover the bucket.

One re-scape later, and we’re back in business.  I need to clean up the wires since they’re visible now, but the setup looks pretty nice.  The cat is relegated to watching the action from the safety of the floor.

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The moral of the story is do it right the first time or else it’s way more work down the road.  Either that or, don’t have an athletic cat.

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Disaster Strikes: The autodoser incident

Sooner or later it will happen to you. Something will go awry and turn your beautiful aqua eco system into a nightmare scenario for your fish, and maybe your whole house.

I was lucky that this wasn’t one of those incidents that required some kind of insurance claim. Some of the inhabitants of my planted 60 gallon aquarium, they weren’t quite so lucky.

I’ve been using a DIY fertilizer dosing setup successfully for some time now.  But, recently, I tore the setup down to rearrange it and top off the liquid fertilizer.  I moved the dosing pump to the outside of the tank near the water line.

After a bunch of testing and re-testing I finally got the system to prime and flow like I wanted. That night I headed off to bed and awoke to the horrifying noise of an air pump running in my cabinet.

The only air pump I have set up in my 60 gallon fish tank is the one used to keep the fertilizer mixed, and it only runs for 5 minutes while the lifter pump is running – at 10 PM.  Here it was 7AM, the 1 liter bottle of fertilizer was nearly empty and the water column had a distinctively tannic look to it.

Then the panic set in.

I quickly performed a 50% water change and unplugged the system. Some of the fish were at the top of the tank, but many of the livestock didn’t seem too bothered by the rich environment.

Later in the day, things weren’t so good.  I saw the ottos were lethargic and looking rough, and there was a dead white cloud minnow on the bottom of the tank.  I transferred the ottos to another tank and did another 50% change

I’ll probably keep doing at least 20% changes regularly this week to make sure all the excess nutrients have been removed, and hope no more fish succumb to the water quality.  One of the ottos sadly did not make it through the night.

I did a post-mortem and found that the timer I use for the dosing system has two on/off settings.  Somehow, I accidentally enabled the second on timer without enabling an off timer.  Essentially the system was programmed to come on at midnight and never turn off.

The takeaway from this is when setting up your equipment, double check everything.  Make sure it works as intended.  Take your time, the results of this simple mistake could have cost me my entire population.  While this was a DIY setup, the same can be said about commercial products as well.

I’m just lucky this didn’t happen with an overflow system or something like that.  It doesn’t take much water leaking to ruin a floor or more.